Our network


CARY, NORTH CAROLINA--The Emory men's and women's tennis programs enjoyed banner performances on the final day of action at the NCAA Division III Championships with a pair of performers bringing home singles championships.

Dillon Pottish captured the men's title with a 6-2, 1-6, 6-2 victory over Nick Ballou (Bah-lew) of Cal Lutheran in the title match, closing out his season record at 34-3. Pottish, last year's national runner-up, becomes the second straight and third Emory player overall to capture the singles title, joining Michael Goodwin (2009) and Chris Goodwin (2011) in that exclusive company.

Gabby Clark toppled top-seeded Lok-Sze Leung (lock-see-lung) of Middlebury College in the women's title showdown, 6-2, 7-6, becoming the third Emory women's player in school annals to earn that coveted distinction. Clark, who ended the year with a 27-4, record, joins Mary Ellen Gordon (2003 and 2004) and Lorne McManigle as other Emory women's singles champions.

Maker defends firefighters' lifesaving backpacks

TUCKER, GA -- For firefighters on a mission of search and rescue, a 30-pound backpack with a 45-minute supply of oxygen can mean the difference between life and death.

In DeKalb County, firefighters say these life-saving units, manufactured by Draeger Safety of Pittsburgh and in use since 2009, have failed 27 times.

Draeger Safety says the units are reliable and effective.

Draeger company officials came to Atlanta to staunchly defend the backpacks, and blame improper maintenance and care for any issues DeKalb County may be having.

"It's a safe and robust product and it meets and exceeds all applicable safety standards for the industry and it simply does not perform in a matter described in reports if it used and maintained properly," said Draeger's vice president, Tim Martin.

But DeKalb Fire Chief Edward O'Brien disagrees. He says some of the units have defective parts.

Three-day Ga. hurricane exercise ends

Three-day Ga. hurricane exercise ends

ATLANTA (AP) - Georgia emergency planners have finished a three-day statewide hurricane exercise.

The HURREX 2012 exercise ended on Thursday. It involved more than 800 people from local, state, volunteer and federal agencies who responded to a simulated Category 3 hurricane that landed south of Savannah.

The simulated storm caused catastrophic damage to buildings along the coast and spawned a tornado in metro Atlanta.

Emergency planners divided the exercise into three different phases: Pre-landfall, post-landfall and recovery. The workers used data and information support sources in scenarios ranging from evacuation to sheltering to search and rescue situations.

Student charged with felony, returns to school with victim

DECATUR- (WXIA) Jennifer Lloyd's son was choked out by a 7th grade classmate off campus earlier this month. Days later, his alleged attacker was back in class. In the Decatur police report, witnesses said Lloyd's son was choked and thrown to the ground, unconscious in a public square. Days later, after he was charged with assault and spent time in a juvenile justice center, the alleged attacker returned to school. He was there right up until the last day of school Friday, alongside the boy he told police he choked.

"These two boys that planned this attack were not only at Field Day, one of the boys started in on my son again, saying he was a wimp, afraid to fight," Lloyd said.

Watershed reopens in new location

BUCKHEAD, Ga. -- Watershed, the restaurant that had been a staple in Decatur for 13 years closed in August 2010, and opens to the public Friday, May 25 in Buckhead at 'The Brookwood' condominium complex.

Emily Saliers, part of the musical folk duo, Indigo Girls, remains a part-owner of the restaurant, along with Ross Jones and Chef Joe Truex.

The singer and restauranteur grew up in Decatur, and still calls the community home... but says the move was necessary for the restaurant's next chapter.

"I think people get attached to their place, like at Decatur Watershed, we had a lot of loyal clientele and people where it was their little spot, but it has time to grow, honestly," Emily Saliers said. "We're so excited about this space. We bring the same vibe."

New study urges African-Americans, Hispanics to learn to swim

ATLANTA -- Earlier this week, we shared the daring rescue of three little boys trapped in a creek in northwest Atlanta. And Atlanta Police Officer rushed in to save their lives.

They made it out safely; however, no one in the group of boys, the youngest being seven-years-old, knew how to swim. 

Which is one of the reasons a new report suggests kids in both black and hispanic communities should learn how to swim.

"Going under water," said Andrew Lewis.

Four-year-old Lewis, now on his fifth swimming lesson at the Decatur-Dekalb YMCA, is taking to the water like a professional.

His instructor, Michael Norment, teaches him technique but most importantly survival tips.

"You never know when you're going to be near a body of water," said Norment.

One student chokes another off-campus, can school help?

DECATUR, Ga. -- A 7th grader admitted to choking a classmate who had to be taken to the hospital afterward, but now he's back in class with that very student. Why? Because the assault apparently took place off campus on a Friday night.

The Decatur police report removed the names of those involved because they are underage. The report says the assault took place on the other side of town from the school in the Decatur public square. 

Witnesses said one 7th grader came up behind another and choked him until he fell to the ground. The student was then arrested after the victim was found lying on the ground crying. The boy told police he choked his classmate to break up a fight. Other witnesses said the student was angry at the boy he choked because he'd broken a third classmate's glasses a week before.